Noise and vibration

10.3 Assessment of potential construction impacts

10.3.1 Haberfield

Two options for construction ancillary facilities around Haberfield are described and assessed in this EIS:

  •   Option A, comprising:
    •   Wattle Street civil and tunnel site (C1a)
    •   Haberfield civil and tunnel site (C2a)
    •   Northcote Street civil site (C3a)
  •   Option B, comprising:
    •   Parramatta Road West civil and tunnel site (C1b)
    •   Haberfield civil site (C2b)
    •   Parramatta Road East civil site (C3b).The construction ancillary facilities that comprise these options were grouped in this assessment and are denoted by the suffix a (for Option A) or b (for Option B) eg C1a Wattle Street civil and tunnel site. The preferred option would be described in the Preferred Infrastructure Report following exhibition of the EIS and discussions with stakeholders and the community.Haberfield Option A

      Description of works

      Works in the Haberfield area under Option A would consist of three construction sites:

    •   Wattle Street civil and tunnel site (C1a)The existing Wattle Street tunnel site, located on the northern side of Wattle Street would be used for the project to support tunnelling activities launched from the Wattle Street ramps. The on and off ramps for the M4-M4 Link tunnels which are to be constructed during the M4 East project would be used for spoil handling during tunnelling works and would utilise an acoustic roller door to minimise noise
    •   Haberfield civil and tunnel site (C2a)The Parramatta Road ventilation facility would be located on the north-eastern corner of the Parramatta Road and Wattle Street intersection. The Parramatta Road ventilation facility would be constructed as part of the M4 East project and fitted out as part of the M4-M5 Link project. Heavy vehicle access to, and egress from the site would be via Parramatta Road, with light vehicles utilising the Northcote Street civil site (C3a) and Wattle Street civil and tunnel site (C1a) for parking

 Northcote Street civil site (C3a)

This site is currently occupied by the Northcote Street tunnel site as part of the M4 East project. At the completion of the M4 East project, Northcote Street would be reopened to traffic and the footpath along Parramatta Road reinstated. The existing tunnel site facilities would be removed and the site used primarily as a car park and laydown area for the duration of the M4-M5 Link project works at Haberfield.

Works schedule

Subject to planning approval, construction activities at Haberfield Option A would be undertaken according to the program shown in Table 10-19.

Table 10-19 Indicative construction program and duration – Haberfield Option A

Wattle Street civil and tunnel site (C1a)

Initial roadworks and traffic management Site establishment and utility works Below ground site set up
Tunnelling

Civil and mechanical fitout

Testing and commissioning

Site rehabilitation and landscaping

Haberfield civil and tunnel site (C2a)

Initial roadworks and traffic management

Site establishment

Below ground site set up

Temporary ventilation for Wattle Street ramps and mainline (tunnelling support activities)

Fitout of ventilation station and substation Tunnelling
Civil and mechanical fitout
Testing and commissioning

Site rehabilitation and landscaping

Northcote Street civil site (C3a)

Make good existing construction ancillary facility from previous M4 East Contractor

Construct car park
Construct laydown area
Operation of car park and laydown area Site rehabilitation and landscaping

 

Airborne noise

The proposed construction activities, NMLs and sound power levels for the typical operation of construction equipment at the Haberfield Option A sites can be found in Appendix J (Technical working paper: Noise and vibration).

A summary of the predicted noise levels (without additional mitigation) in each of the NCAs for the various work activities is also presented in Appendix J (Technical working paper: Noise and vibration). These results are split into residential, commercial and other sensitive receivers.

The predicted noise levels presented in Table 10-21 and Appendix J (Technical working paper: Noise and vibration) are representative of the worst case impacts where works are undertaken closest to each NCA. For most construction activities, it is expected that the construction noise levels would frequently be lower than predicted at the most-exposed receiver as the noise levels presented in this report are based on a realistic worst case assessment.

NMLs have been derived for the works at Haberfield based on the measured background noise levels for airborne noise provided in Appendix J (Technical working paper: Noise and vibration). These are outlined in Table 10-20. The airborne noise NML for commercial receivers in all NCAs is 70 dBA.

 

Table 10-20 Residential NMLs for Haberfield Option A

NCA

Receiver type

Standard construction (RBL+10 dBA)

Out of hours (RBL+5 dBA)1

Sleep disturbance screening (RBL+15 dBA)

Daytime period

Daytime period

Evening period

Night period

NCA01

Residential

56

51

51

43

53

NCA02

Residential

68

63

63

57

67

NCA03

Residential

68

63

60

49

59

NCA04

Residential

66

61

58

48

58

NCA05

Residential

61

56

54

47

57

NCA06

Residential

56

51

51

48

58

NCA07

Residential

56

51

51

48

58

Note

1: Out of Hours construction hours includes both evening and night-time construction hours. Evening hours are 6.00 pm to 10.00 pm Monday to Sunday. Night-time hours are 10.00 pm to 7.00 am Monday to Friday and 10.00 pm to 8.00 am Saturday, Sunday and public holidays.

Table 10-21 Predicted airborne noise for Haberfield Option A

Component

Activity

Indicative duration (weeks)

Proposed time of occurrence

Predicted worst case LAeq15min level in each NCA (dBA)

Sound power level (dBA)

Sound pressure level at 10 m (dBA)

At least affected NCA

At worst affected NCA

Site establishment

Installation of environmental controls

1

Y

N

N

47

74

108

80

Pavement and infrastructure works

2

Y

Y

Y

55

77

116

88

Establishment of construction facilities

4

Y

N

N

53

80

114

86

Tunnelling and supporting works

Onsite car parking

132

Y

Y

Y

36

63

97

69

Workshop, deliveries, maintenance, and storage

132

Y

Y

Y

41

64

103

75

Northcote Street civil site – on site truck movements

132

Y

Y

Y

<30

47

98

70

Wattle Street ramps – on site truck movements

132

Y

Y

Y

<30

52

98

70

Tunnelling support activities

72

Y

Y

Y

<30

46

91

63

Day Evening Night

Component

Activity

Indicative duration (weeks)

Proposed time of occurrence

Predicted worst case LAeq15min level in each NCA (dBA)

Sound power level (dBA)

Sound pressure level at 10 m (dBA)

At least affected NCA

At worst affected NCA

Construction

Wattle Street line marking

1

Y

Y

Y

<30

52

109

81

Ventilation building installation

72

Y

N

N

34

57

102

74

Site rehabilitation and landscaping

Site rehabilitation and landscaping

33

Y

N

N

44

71

105

77

Day Evening Night

The highest predicted noise levels and greatest impacts are associated with activities that utilise noise intensive plant items, including:

  •   Diamond/concrete saws
  •   Excavators with breakers.
    Short duration works (up to four weeks) which are required within this study area consist of:
  •   Installation of environmental controls
  •   Pavement and infrastructure works
  •   Establishment of construction facilities.During standard daytime construction hours, the highest impacts (up to 20 dBA exceedance of NMLs) associated with short term works are generally predicted to be at receivers immediately adjacent to construction sites during the use of noise intensive plant items such as concrete saws.Works undertaken outside of standard construction hours have the potential for greater noise impacts (greater than 20 dBA exceedance of NMLs) throughout the study area, especially during the most sensitive night-time period. This is due to more stringent NMLs during these periods than during the daytime. Impacts during this period are likely to extend beyond receivers immediately adjacent to the works areas.

    Long term construction works (up to 132 weeks) required within this study area consists of:

  •   Tunnelling activities, including the operation of laydown areas and car parking
  •   Construction and fitout of the ventilation facility
  •   Site rehabilitation works.During standard daytime construction hours, the highest impacts (up to 10 dBA exceedance of NMLs) associated with long term works are generally predicted to be at receivers which are immediately adjacent to the worksites.During works outside of standard construction hours, the highest impacts (up to 10 dBA exceedance of NMLs) associated with long term works are generally predicted to be at receivers which are immediately adjacent to the construction sites.

    Highly noise affected residential receivers

    The ICNG considers residential receivers that are subject to predicted noise levels of 75 dBA or greater to be highly noise affected. The number of highly noise affected receivers in the study area has been determined and is summarised in Table 10-22. The table shows the number of highly noise affected residential receivers separated by works activity.

    Table 10-22 Predicted number of highly noise affected residential receivers by works

Activity

Period

Day

Eve

Night

Installation of environmental controls

Pavement and infrastructure works

5

5

5

Establishment of construction facilities

5

Onsite car parking

Workshop, deliveries, maintenance, and storage

Onsite truck movements – Northcote Street

Onsite truck movements – Wattle Street ramps

Tunnelling support activities

Wattle Street line marking

Activity

Period

Day

Eve

Night

Ventilation building installation

Site rehabilitation and landscaping

Cumulative works scenario

The above table shows that receivers are predicted to be highly noise affected during certain works activities. The highest numbers are apparent during:

  •   Pavement and infrastructure works, where five receivers are predicted to be highly noise affected
  •   Establishment of construction facilities, where five receivers are predicted to be highly noiseaffected.Both of these works activities require the use of highly noise intrusive equipment such as concrete saws. It is important to note that the installation of environmental controls and establishment of construction facilities are expected to occur for a relatively short period time and that the use of the most noise intrusive equipment (concrete saws) would be expected to be only occurring sporadically throughout the duration of works.

    The location of the highly noise affected residential receivers, from all works and in any time period, are shown in Figure 10-14.

Other sensitive receivers

Other sensitive receivers, such as educational facilities, hospitals and childcare centres, which are potentially affected by construction works have been assessed against the various criteria detailed in section 10.1.3.

The predicted NML exceedances for other sensitive receivers are summarised in Table 10-23. The assessment provides further context to the predicted worst case noise levels presented in Table 10-21 as it presents the number of and type of receivers predicted to experience exceedances of the NMLs, summarised in bands of 10 dBA.

Table 10-23 Overview of sensitive receiver NML exceedances

The above table shows the following:

  •   Other sensitive receivers in this precinct are generally predicted to be subject to relatively minor noise impacts. Receivers in the education, medical and remaining categories would not be subject to any NML exceedances
  •   Only one ‘other sensitive receiver’ in this area would be subject to worst case exceedances of 11 to 20 dBA above NML during the higher noise generating activities. This receiver is the Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses at 12 Wattle Street, Haberfield (located within NCA02).The recommended ‘standard’ and ‘additional’ noise mitigation as discussed in section 10.1.8 along with recommended specific site mitigation measures would be implemented to mitigate NML exceedances at other sensitive receivers.

Table 10-24 provides a summary of the key activities within each NCA affected by activities in the Haberfield Option A works area.

Table 10-24 Location summary of construction impacts – Haberfield Option A

NCA

Location

NCA01

Most affected receivers: Residential and commercial receivers which are opposite the Northcote Street civil site (C3a) along Parramatta Road, between Page Avenue and Fredrick Street

Worst case construction scenario: Worksite car parking and deliveries during the night- time period, and pavement and infrastructure work during all works periods

Highest construction noise impacts: Use of a concrete saw during the night-time period as part of pavement and infrastructure works

NCA02

Most affected receivers: Residential receivers which adjoin the Northcote Street civil site

(C3a) between Wolseley Street and Wattle Street, and receivers which front Wattle Street between Parramatta Road and Ash Lane

Worst case construction scenario: Worksite car parking and deliveries during the night- time period, and pavement and infrastructure work during all works periods

Highest construction noise impacts: Use of a concrete saw during the night-time period as part of pavement and infrastructure works

NCA03

Most affected receivers: Residential receivers which front Wattle Street and adjoin the Wattle Street civil and tunnel Site (C1a) and the Haberfield civil and tunnel site (C2a) between Ash Lane and Ramsay Street

Worst case construction scenario: Worksite car parking and deliveries, truck movements exiting the Wattle Street ramps during the night-time period, and pavement and infrastructure work during all works periods

Highest construction noise impacts: Use of a concrete saw during the night-time period as part of pavement and infrastructure works

NCA04

Most affected receivers: Residential receivers which front Wattle Street between Ramsay Street and Martin Street

Worst case construction scenario: Worksite car parking and deliveries during the night- time period, and pavement and infrastructure work during all works periods

Highest construction noise impacts: Use of a concrete saw during the night-time period as part of pavement and infrastructure works

NCA05

Most affected receivers: Receivers which front Dobroyd Parade between Martin Street and Waratah Street

Worst case construction scenario: Pavement and infrastructure work during all out of hours periods. Note that no daytime impacts are predicted within this NCA. Impacts associated with short term works are predicted for outside of standard construction periods only

Highest construction noise impacts: Use of a concrete saw during the night-time period as part of pavement and infrastructure works

NCA06

Most affected receivers: Receivers which adjoin the Haberfield civil and tunnel site (C2a) which are situated along Walker Avenue between Parramatta Road and Allum Street

Worst case construction scenario: Worksite car parking and deliveries during the night- time period, and by pavement and infrastructure work during all works periods

Highest construction noise impacts: Use of a concrete saw during the night-time period as part of pavement and infrastructure works

 

NCA

Location

NCA07

Most affected receivers: Receivers which are situated along Bland Street between Denman Avenue and Parramatta Road

Worst case construction scenario: Minor impacts are predicted during pavement and infrastructure work during all out of hours periods. Note that no daytime impacts are predicted within this NCA. Impacts associated with short term works are predicted for outside of standard construction periods only

Highest construction noise impacts: Use of a concrete saw during the night-time period as part of pavement and infrastructure works

 

Cumulative construction impacts

Given the number of work sites associated with the project within the Haberfield study area, it is likely that receivers would, occasionally, be subject to potential cumulative noise impacts from concurrent activities which may occur within the Wattle Street civil and tunnel site (C1a), Haberfield civil and tunnel site (C2a) and the Northcote Street civil site (C3a). This would most likely be apparent during the night period where cumulative impacts are predicted to exceed the NML by up to 10 dBA.

Consecutive construction impacts

The Haberfield study area would likely be subject to potential construction impacts from works associated with other infrastructure projects, including the approved and currently under construction M4 East project. This project, together with the M4-M5 Link, tie in to Wattle Street at Haberfield, where receivers would likely be exposed to extended impacts associated with the consecutive construction of both projects.

The short-term noise intensive works are generally associated with discrete activities which occur over a number of days or weeks in moving locations rather than throughout the entire project at fixed locations. Therefore, the focus of assessing consecutive impacts is to identify works activities which repeat (or are similar to other activities) over extended periods. The longer-term impacts associated with construction ancillary facility activity may continue between separate projects in the area and may appear to be of a similar nature to the community.

The receivers most likely to be affected by consecutive construction impacts are:

  •   Receivers adjoining the Northcote Street civil site (C3a). This site is currently a tunnel site for the M4 East project, with an acoustic shed constructed across the site
  •   Receivers adjoining Wattle Street and Walker Avenue which have line of sight to the Wattle Street civil and tunnel site (C1a) and the Haberfield civil and tunnel site (C2a).In situations where consecutive long term construction noise impacts occur, at-receiver noise mitigation may be considered where feasible and reasonable, once options for at source noise mitigation and management measures have been exhausted. The requirement for this should be evaluated in consultation with Roads and Maritime and the community during detailed design, and should be considered when preparing the site-specific Construction Noise and Vibration Impact Statements (CNVIS) for this area.Construction road traffic

    The assessment indicates that construction traffic is unlikely to result in a noticeable increase in LAeq noise levels at receivers along the proposed construction traffic routes (Parramatta Road and Wattle Street). It is also important to note that no local roads would be used by heavy vehicles during works.

    Management of construction impacts

    The assessment of construction impacts identified the following in-situ mitigation measures that should be included for this study area:

 Increased hoarding to height of four metres around the ancillary facilities.

 

Ground-borne noise and vibration impacts

Works with the potential to cause ground-borne noise impacts in this area, such as excavation of the ventilation facility, ventilation tunnels, Wattle Street dive structures and tunnel stubs, are being undertaken as part of the M4 East project works.

Ground-borne noise from tunnelling works associated with construction of the mainline tunnel alignment and access ramps is summarised in section 10.3.7.

As such, airborne noise emissions from the Haberfield Option A construction sites are predicted to be higher than the ground-borne noise levels. For this reason, ground-borne noise is not anticipated to be the controlling factor for these works. Vibration intensive works at the Haberfield Option A site such as demolition of existing buildings, piling works and rock breaking will be undertaken by the M4 East project, and as such, are not considered within this assessment. Vibration from tunnelling works associated with construction of the M4-M5 Link mainline tunnel alignment and connections to the Wattle Street ramps is assessed in section 10.3.7.

The following mitigation measures would be considered where feasible and practicable:

  •   Validation of predicted ground-borne noise levels (note that this may not be required where the ground-borne noise impacts would last less than three weeks at any one sensitive receiver and should be confirmed during detailed design)
  •   Use of alternative method to de-couple load path/equipment that generates less vibration where feasible and reasonable
  •   Notification letterbox drops to receivers in the area around the works location, detailing work activities, time periods over which these would occur, impacts and mitigation measures
  •   Specific notifications provided to receivers where the ground-borne noise levels are predicted to exceed the night-time NMLs, providing additional information when relevant and more specific information than covered in general letterbox drops
  •   Respite periods may be offered to the affected residents during works where vibration intensive plant levels are predicted to be operated within the safe working distance for human comfort for an extended period of time on any one day.The specific management strategy for addressing potential impacts associated with ground-borne noise outside of standard daytime construction hours would be documented in the out-of-hours work (OOHW) protocol.

    Haberfield/Ashfield Option B

    Description of works

    The Haberfield Option B works area consists of three construction sites – Parramatta Road West civil and tunnel site (C1b), Haberfield civil site (C2b) and Parramatta Road East civil site (C3b) which all fall within the M4 East footprint.

Key construction activities to be carried out include:

  •   Demolition of existing buildings and structures (C1b and C3b only)
  •   Utility works including protection and/or adjustment of existing utilities, removal of redundant utilities and installation of new utilities (C1b and C3b only)
  •   Establishment of site offices, amenities and temporary infrastructure (all sites)
  •   Laydown and storage of materials (all sites)
  •   Delivery of materials, plant and equipment (all sites)
  •   Construction of an acoustic shed (C1b only)
  •   Construction of a temporary access tunnel (C1b only)
  •   Tunnel excavation of the eastbound and westbound mainline tunnels and the Wattle Street entry and exit ramps using roadheaders, as well as stockpiling of excavated material and spoil haulage. (C1b only)
  •   Mechanical and electrical fitout of a section of the Parramatta Road ventilation facility (that will be built as part of the M4 East project) (C2b only)
  •   Demobilisation including works to prepare the site for a permissible future use (all sites).Parramatta Road West civil and tunnel site (C1b)The Parramatta Road West civil and tunnel site (C1b) would be located west of Parramatta Road between Alt Street and Bland Street at Ashfield. The site is currently occupied by a commercial car dealership and several commercial properties. Residential properties including single dwelling and apartment blocks are located to the immediate west and north. A construction site for the M4 East project is located to the south.

    The site would be used for tunnelling support during construction and would include temporary site offices, a workshop and storage facilities, a laydown area, entry and exit points for construction traffic, a temporary substation, temporary ventilation for the tunnels, a temporary water treatment plant and sediment pond, workforce amenities and car parking.

    An acoustic shed with a roller door would be established on the site to minimise noise from out-of- hours tunnelling and spoil handling. In addition, temporary noise mitigation measures may include noise barriers and other temporary structures such as site buildings, which would be positioned to minimise effects from noise on surrounding properties.

    Construction traffic would enter and exit the site to and from the western (northbound) carriageway of Parramatta Road via new driveways.

    Spoil handling on the site would occur 24 hours a day, seven days a week, within an acoustic shed. Excavated spoil from tunnelling would only be stockpiled within the acoustic shed. Heavy vehicle movements associated with the removal of spoil from tunnelling would only occur via access and egress directly to and from Parramatta Road.

    Haberfield civil site (C2b)

    The Haberfield civil site (C2b) would be used for civil construction where Option B is selected as the preferred construction option at Haberfield. If Option A is selected as the preferred option, the Haberfield civil and tunnel site (C2a) would be used.

    The Haberfield civil site would be located at the south-eastern corner of the Parramatta Road and Wattle Street intersection, extending along Parramatta Road between Wattle Street and Walker Avenue. This construction ancillary facility would use land that is currently being used as a construction ancillary facility for the M4 East project.

    The Haberfield civil site (C2b) would be used to support civil construction of a substation, and fitout of permanent operational infrastructure including the Parramatta Road ventilation facility (being constructed as part of the M4 East project). The site would include temporary site offices, workshop and storage facilities, laydown areas, ingress and egress for heavy and light vehicles, workforce amenities and car parking.

    Heavy vehicles delivering materials and equipment would enter and exit the Haberfield civil site (C2b) via the westbound Wattle Street carriageways. Light vehicles would enter and leave the site via Wattle Street and Walker Avenue.

    Parramatta Road East civil site (C3b)

    The Parramatta Road East civil site (C3b) would be located east of Parramatta Road at Haberfield between Alt Street and Bland Street. The site is currently occupied by a commercial car dealership. Residential properties are located to the immediate east and north. A construction site for the M4 East project is located to the south.

    The Parramatta Road East civil site (C3b) would be used to support tunnelling construction activities that would occur at the Parramatta Road West civil site (C1b) and to provide construction workforce parking. The site would include temporary site offices, ingress and egress for light vehicles, workforce amenities and car parking.

Works schedule

Subject to planning approval, construction activities at Haberfield/Ashfield Option B would be undertaken according to the program shown in Table 10-25.

Table 10-25 Indicative construction program and duration – Haberfield/Ashfield Option B

Component 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022

Parramatta Road West civil and tunnel site (C1b)

Site establishment and utility works Construction of temporary access tunnel Tunnelling
Civil and mechanical fitout

Testing and commissioning

Site rehabilitation

Haberfield civil site (C2b)

Initial roadworks and traffic management Site establishment and utility works

Fitout of Parramatta Road ventilation facility and substation

Civil and mechanical fitout

Testing and commissioning

Site rehabilitation and landscaping

Parramatta Road East civil site (C3b)

Site establishment and utility works

Use of car park and site amenities during construction

Demobilisation

Airborne noise

The proposed construction activities, NMLs and sound power levels for the typical operation of construction equipment at the Haberfield Option B sites can be found in Appendix J (Technical working paper: Noise and vibration).

A summary of the predicted noise levels (without additional mitigation) in each of the NCAs for the various work activities is also presented in Appendix J (Technical working paper: Noise and vibration). These results are split into residential, commercial and other sensitive receivers.

The predicted noise levels presented in Table 10-27 and Appendix J (Technical working paper: Noise and vibration) are representative of the worst case impacts where works are undertaken closest to each NCA. For most construction activities, it is expected that the construction noise levels would frequently be lower than predicted at the most-exposed receiver as the noise levels presented in this report are based on a realistic worst case assessment.

 

NMLs have been derived for the works at Haberfield based on the measured background noise levels provided in Appendix J (Technical working paper: Noise and vibration). These are outlined in Table 10-26. The NML for commercial receivers in all NCAs is 70 dBA.

 

Table 10-26 Residential NMLs for Haberfield/Ashfield Option B

NCA

Receiver type

Standard construction (RBL+10dBA)

Out of hours (RBL+5dBA)1

Sleep disturbance screening (RBL+15)

Daytime period

Daytime period

Evening period

Night period

NCA01

Residential

56

51

51

43

53

NCA02

Residential

68

63

63

57

67

NCA03

Residential

68

63

60

49

59

NCA04

Residential

66

61

58

48

58

NCA05

Residential

61

56

54

47

57

NCA06

Residential

56

51

51

48

58

NCA07

Residential

56

51

51

48

58

Note:

1: Out of hours construction hours includes both evening and night-time construction hours. Evening hours are 6.00 pm to 10.00 pm Monday to Sunday. Night-time hours are 10.00 pm to 7.00 am Monday to Friday and 10.00 pm to 8.00 am Saturday, Sunday and public holidays.

Table 10-27 Predicted airborne noise for Haberfield/Ashfield Option B

Component

Activity

Indicative duration (weeks)

Proposed time of occurrence

Predicted worst case LAeq15min level in each NCA (dBA)

Sound power level (dBA)

Sound pressure level at 10 m (dBA)

At least affected NCA

At worst affected NCA

Site establishment

Demolition of existing buildings

4

Y

N

N

48

86

120

92

Utility works

2

Y

N

N

45

83

117

89

Installation of environmental controls

1

Y

N

N

44

74

108

80

Pavement and infrastructure works

2

Y

Y

Y

54

78

118

90

Establishment of construction facilities

4

Y

N

N

50

80

114

86

Tunnelling and supporting works

Onsite car parking

168

Y

Y

Y

30

63

97

69

Workshop, deliveries, maintenance, and storage

168

Y

Y

Y

40

69

103

75

Spoil handling inside acoustic shed

168

Y

Y

Y

36

70

97

69

Day Evening Night

Component

Activity

Indicative duration (weeks)

Proposed time of occurrence

Predicted worst case LAeq15min level in each NCA (dBA)

Sound power level (dBA)

Sound pressure level at 10 m (dBA)

At least affected NCA

At worst affected NCA

Tunnelling support activities

168

Y

Y

Y

<30

42

82

54

Construction

Ventilation building fitout and installation

84

Y

N

N

34

57

102

74

Site rehabilitation and landscaping

Site rehabilitation and landscaping

12

Y

N

N

41

71

105

77

Day Evening Night

The highest predicted noise levels and greatest impacts are associated with activities which utilise noise intensive plant items, including:

  •   Diamond/concrete saws
  •   Excavators with breakers.
    Short duration works (up to four weeks) which are required within this study area consist of:
  •   Demolition of existing structures
  •   Utility works
  •   Establishment of construction facilities.During standard daytime construction hours, the highest impacts (greater than 20 dBA exceedance of NMLs) associated with short term works are generally predicted to be at receivers immediately adjacent to construction sites during the use of noise intensive plant items such as concrete saws and rock breakers.Works undertaken outside of standard construction hours have the potential for greater noise impacts (greater than 20 dBA exceedance of NMLs) throughout the study area, especially during the most sensitive night-time period. This is due to more stringent NMLs during these periods than during the daytime. Impacts during this period are likely to extend beyond receivers immediately adjacent to the works areas.

    Long term construction works (up to 168 weeks) required within this study area consists of:

  •   Tunnelling activities, including the operation of laydown areas and car parking
  •   Ventilation building fitout and installation
  •   Site rehabilitation works.During works outside of standard construction hours, the highest impacts (up to 20 dBA exceedance of NMLs) associated with long term works are generally predicted to be at receivers which are on Parramatta Road and receivers which adjoin the Parramatta Road West civil and tunnel site (C1b) to the west.Highly affected noise receivers

    The ICNG considers residential receivers that are subject to predicted noise levels of 75 dBA or greater to be Highly Noise Affected. The number of Highly Noise Affected receivers in the study area has been determined and is summarised in Table 10-28. The table shows the number of residential receivers separated by works activity.

    Table 10-28 Predicted number of highly noise affected residential receivers by works

Activity

Period

Day

Eve

Night

Demolition of existing buildings

13

Utility works

9

Installation of environmental controls

Pavement and infrastructure works

7

7

7

Establishment of construction facilities

7

Onsite car parking

Workshop, deliveries, maintenance, and storage

Spoil handling inside acoustic shed

Tunnelling support activities

Ventilation building fit out and installation

Site rehabilitation and landscape

Cumulative

The above table shows that receivers are predicted to be Highly Noise Affected during certain works activities. The highest numbers are apparent during the demolition of existing buildings and utility works, where 13 and nine receivers are predicted to be highly noise affected. These works would be required during standard daytime construction hours. While only seven receivers are predicted to be highly noise affected during pavement and infrastructure works, this activity would be required both during and outside standard daytime construction hours in all time periods.

All activities indicated to result in highly noise affected residential receivers include the use of highly noise intrusive equipment such as diamond/concrete saws and rock breakers. It is important to note that activities that may result in highly noise affected receivers are expected to occur for a relatively short period of time and that the use of the most noise intensive equipment would only sporadically be required at times throughout the duration of works.

The location of the highly noise affected residential receivers, from all works and in any time period, are shown in Figure 10-15.

 

The most affected receivers are typically dwellings which surround and have direct line of sight to the various works location. Worst case noise levels, however, would only be expected to be apparent when high noise generating works are being carried out immediately adjacent to these residential receivers.

Other sensitive receivers

Other sensitive receivers, such as educational facilities, hospitals and childcare centres, which are potentially affected by construction works have been assessed against the various criteria detailed in section 10.1.3.

The predicted NML exceedances for other sensitive receivers are summarised in Table 10-29. The assessment provides further context to the predicted worst case noise levels presented in Table 10-27 as it presents the number of and type of receivers predicted to experience exceedances of the NMLs, summarised in bands of 10 dBA.

Table 10-29 Overview of sensitive receiver NML exceedances

Cumulative scenario

Note:
1: The ‘Remaining’ category includes public buildings, libraries, café/bars, etc. The above table shows the following:

  •   Other sensitive receivers in this precinct are generally predicted be subject to relatively minor noise impacts
  •   Three ‘other sensitive receivers’ in this area would be subject to worst case exceedances of 11 to 20 dBA above NML during the higher noise generating activities. These receivers are:
  •   Child care – The Infants Home at 17 Henry Street, Haberfield (located within NCA01)
  •   Place of worship – Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses at 12 Wattle Street, Haberfield(located within NCA02)
  •   Educational facility – Juvenile Justice – Yasmar training facility (located within NCA07).

The recommended ‘standard’ and ‘additional’ noise mitigation as discussed in section 10.1.8 along with recommended specific site mitigation measures would be implemented to mitigate NML exceedances at other sensitive receivers.

NCA summary

Table 10-30 provides a summary of the key activities within each NCA affected by activities in the Haberfield Option B works area.

Table 10-30 Location summary of construction impacts – Haberfield/Ashfield Option B

NCA

Location

NCA00

Most affected receivers: Residential receivers which are situated to the south of the

Parramatta Road West civil and tunnel site (C1b) on Parramatta Road between Bland Street and Chandos Street

Worst case construction scenario: Pavement and infrastructure works and spoil handling works within the acoustic shed during all works periods

Highest construction noise impacts: Use of a rock breaker during the daytime period as part of the demolition works and use of a concrete saw during the night-time period as part of the pavement and infrastructure works

NCA01

Most affected receivers: Residential receivers which adjoin the Parramatta Road West civil and tunnel site (C1b) between Bland Street and the Bunnings Warehouse on Parramatta Road

Worst case construction scenario: Pavement and infrastructure works and spoil handling works within the acoustic shed during all works periods

Highest construction noise impacts: Use of a rock breaker during the daytime period as part of the demolition works and use of a concrete saw during the night-time period as part of the pavement and infrastructure works. Also, noise impacts from spoil works within the Parramatta Road West civil and tunnel site (C1b) during all periods

NCA02

Most affected receivers: Residential receivers which adjoin Wattle Street between Parramatta Road and Ash Lane

Worst case construction scenario: Pavement and infrastructure works during all works periods associated with the Haberfield civil site (C2b)

Highest construction noise impacts: Use of a concrete saw during the night-time period as part of pavement and infrastructure works

NCA03

Most affected receivers: Residential receivers which front Wattle Street between Ash Lane and Ramsay Street

Worst case construction scenario: Pavement and infrastructure works during all works periods associated with the Haberfield civil site (C2b)

Highest construction noise impacts: Use of a concrete saw during the night-time period as part of pavement and infrastructure works

NCA04

Most affected receivers: Residential receivers which front Wattle Street between Ramsay

Street and Martin Street

Worst case construction scenario: Pavement and infrastructure works during all works periods associated with the Haberfield civil site (C2b)

Highest construction noise impacts: Use of a concrete saw during the night-time period as part of pavement and infrastructure works

 

NCA

Location

NCA05

Most affected receivers: Receivers which front Dobroyd Parade between Martin Street and Waratah Street

Worst case construction scenario: Pavement and infrastructure works during all works periods associated with the Haberfield civil site (C2b)

Highest construction noise impacts: Use of a concrete saw during the night-time period as part of pavement and infrastructure works

NCA06

Most affected receivers: Receivers which adjoin the Haberfield civil site (C2b) on Walker Avenue, between Allum Street and Parramatta Road, and residential receivers located on Alt Street which adjoin the Parramatta Road East civil site (C3b)

Worst case construction scenario: Demolition works during the daytime period and pavement and infrastructure works during all works periods

Highest construction noise impacts: Use of a rock breaker during the daytime period as part of the demolition works and use of a concrete saw during the night-time period as part of the pavement and infrastructure works

NCA07

Most affected receivers: Residential receivers which are situated to the south of the Parramatta Road East civil site (C3b), between Bland Street and Chandos Street on Parramatta Road

Worst case construction scenario: Demolition works during the daytime period and Pavement and infrastructure works during all works periods

Highest construction noise impacts: Use of a rock breaker during the daytime period as part of the demolition works and use of a concrete saw during the night-time period as part of the pavement and infrastructure works

Cumulative construction impacts

Given the number of work sites associated with the project within the Haberfield study area, it is likely that receivers would, occasionally, be subject to potential cumulative noise impacts from construction sites operating concurrently in the same area. This would most likely be apparent during the night period where cumulative impacts are predicted to exceed the NML by greater than 20 dBA within NCA01.

Consecutive construction impacts

The Haberfield study area would likely be subject to potential construction impacts from works associated with other infrastructure projects, including the approved and currently under construction WestConnex M4 East project together with the M4-M5 Link, tie in to Wattle Street and Parramatta Road at Haberfield, where receivers would likely be exposed to extended impacts associated with the consecutive construction of both projects.

The short-term noise intensive works are generally associated with discrete activities which occur over a number of days or weeks in moving locations rather than throughout the entire project at fixed locations. Therefore, the focus of assessing consecutive impacts is to identify works activities which repeat (or are similar to other activities) over extended periods. The longer-term impacts associated with construction ancillary facility activity may continue between separate projects in the area and may appear to be of a similar nature to the community.

The receivers most likely to be affected by consecutive construction impacts are:

 Receivers adjoining the Parramatta Road West civil and tunnel site (C1b), Parramatta Road East civil site (C3b) and Haberfield civil site (C2b), between Walker Avenue and Chandos Street.

In situations where consecutive long term construction noise impacts occur, at-receiver noise mitigation may be considered where feasible and reasonable, once options for at source noise mitigation and management measures have been exhausted. The requirement for this should be

evaluated in consultation with Roads and Maritime and the community during detailed design, and should be considered when preparing the site specific CNVIS for this area.

Construction road traffic

The assessment indicates that construction traffic is unlikely to result in a noticeable increase in LAeq noise levels at receivers along the proposed construction traffic routes.

Management of construction impacts

The assessment of construction impacts identified the following in-situ mitigation measures that should be included for this study area:

  •   Increased site hoarding to height of four metres around the ancillary facilities
  •   Upgrading the acoustic shed performance
  •   Limiting the total internal sound power level to 110 dBA within the acoustic shed. Ground-borne noise and vibration impactsWorks with the potential to cause ground-borne noise impacts in this area, such as excavation of the ventilation facility, ventilation tunnels, Wattle Street dive structures and tunnel stubs, are being undertaken as part of the M4 East project works.Ground-borne noise from tunnelling works associated with construction of the mainline tunnel alignment and access ramps is summarised in section 10.3.7.

    Based on the excavation of the access tunnel at this site, eight residential receivers are predicted to exceed the night-time ground-borne NML for up to approximately 20 days. While most roadheader works would be anticipated to progress at a consistent rate, there may be discreet locations which require a longer duration of tunnelling works due to site conditions.

    Up to 22 buildings in this area may be within the minimum vibration working distances should a large rock-breaker be used at the outer extents of the Haberfield/Ashfield Option B works area. For this scenario, around 66 receivers in the vicinity of the site would fall within the nominated minimum working distance for human comfort vibration should a large rock-breaker be used at the outer extents of the works area. No heritage-listed items have been identified as having the potential to be within the minimum safe working distances should a large rock-breaker be used at the outer extents of the project footprint.

    The following mitigation measures should be considered where feasible and reasonable:

  •   Validation of predicted ground-borne noise levels (note that this may not be required where the ground-borne noise impacts would last less than three weeks at any one sensitive receiver and should be confirmed during detailed design)
  •   Notification letterbox drops to receivers in the area around the works locations, detailing work activities, time periods over which these would occur, impacts and mitigation measures
  •   Specific notifications provided to receivers where the ground-borne noise levels are predicted to exceed the night-time NML, providing additional information when relevant and more specific information than covered in general letterbox drops.
  •   Validation of predicted vibration levels at the nearest receiver buildings to the vibration intensive works
  •   Use of alternative method to de-couple load path/equipment that generates less vibration where feasible and reasonable
  •   Notification letterbox drops to receivers in the area around the works locations, detailing work activities, time periods over which these would occur, impacts and mitigation measures
  •   Respite periods may be offered to the affected residents during works where vibration intensive plant levels are predicted to be operated within the safe working distance for human comfort for an extended period of time on any one day.

The specific management strategy for addressing potential impacts associated with ground-borne noise outside of standard daytime construction hours would be documented in the OOHW protocol.

10.3.7 Mainline tunnel alignment

Ground-borne noise

Figure 10-20 shows the approximate tunnel depths (from ground elevation to the tunnel crown) for the project alignment and illustrates that the tunnel depth varies from a few metres below ground in the vicinity of the tunnel portals, to up to around 65 metres below ground at the deepest points.

The ground-borne noise assessment is based on the worst case predicted LAeq internal ground-borne noise level when the tunnelling works are at their closest point below each receiver.

Given the progression rate of the roadheader works (about 20 to 25 metres per week), it is anticipated that the worst case ground-borne noise impacts along the majority of the alignment would only be apparent for a relatively short period of time (ie several days for each roadheader) while the tunnelling works are directly beneath a particular sensitive receiver. As the works progress and move away, a particular receiver’s exposure to ground-borne noise would notably reduce. This concept is illustrated in Figure 10-21.

The figure indicates that the night-time NML of 35 dBA LAeq(15minute) is likely to be exceeded at a particular location as each roadheader passes for the following approximate durations:

  •   10 days where a slant distance of about 20 metres from the tunnels is apparent
  •   11 days where a slant distance of about 15 metres from the tunnels is apparent
  •   13 days where a slant distance of about 10 metres from the tunnels is apparent.Figure 10-21 Ground-borne noise levels at slant distances from roadheader (progress = 20 m/week)

    No surface works associated with the mainline tunnel alignment would occur outside of the areas discussed above and therefore the impacts at receivers for the construction of the mainline tunnel alignment would be limited to ground-borne noise and vibration.

    At residential locations greater than a distance of 30 metres from the nearest tunnel (ie taking into account the tunnel depth and the horizontal offset distance), exceedances of the ground-borne NML of 35 dBA LAeq(15minute) during night-time periods are unlikely.

    Based on a progression rate of approximately 20 to 25 metres per week for the excavation using roadheaders, potential ground-borne noise impacts are predicted at the following locations:

 In Haberfield (near Wattle Street, north of Martin Street), where the tunnel ramps climb to meet with the Wattle Street tunnel stubs, 46 receivers are predicted to experience noise levels above the criteria for about 19 days for each roadheader. Ground-borne noise levels of up to approximately 44 dBA LAeq(15minute) are predicted when tunnelling equipment is located at the shortest distance to the receiver

 In the vicinity of the Rozelle interchange (primarily to the north of Lilyfield Road and around Catherine Street), where the tunnel ramps climb to meet City West Link, 225 receivers are predicted to experience noise levels above the criteria for about 19 days for each roadheader. Ground-borne noise levels of up to approximately 45 dBA LAeq(15minute) are predicted when tunnelling equipment is located at the shortest distance to the receiver. Due to the number of tunnels being constructed in this area (consecutive construction works) the duration of impacts may extend at these locations

  •   In the vicinity of the Iron Cove Link tunnel portals (south of Victoria Road between Toelle Street and Cambridge Street), where the tunnel ramps climb to meet Victoria Road, 29 receivers are predicted to experience noise levels above the criteria for about 17 days for each roadheader. Ground-borne noise levels of up to approximately 42 dBA LAeq(15minute) are predicted when tunnelling equipment is located at the shortest distance to the receiver
  •   At Annandale (between Moore, Catherine, Reserve and Annandale streets) where the tunnels veer north towards the Rozelle interchange, 48 receivers are predicted to experience noise levels above the criteria for up to around 12 days for each roadheader. Ground-borne noise levels of up to about 44 dBA LAeq(15minute) are predicted when tunnelling equipment is located at the shortest distance to the receiver
  •   In the vicinity of the St Peters interchange (west of Sydney Park), where the tunnel ramps climb to meet the St Peters tunnel stubs, 39 receivers are predicted to experience noise levels above the criteria for about 19 days for each roadheader. Ground-borne noise levels of up to approximately 44 dBA LAeq(15minute) are predicted when tunnelling equipment is located at the shortest distance to the receiver.While most roadheader works would be anticipated to progress at a consistent rate, there may be discrete locations which require a longer duration of tunnelling works due to site conditions.

    The following mitigation measures would be considered where feasible and reasonable:

  •   Validation of predicted ground-borne noise levels (note that this may not be required where the ground-borne noise impacts would last less than three weeks at any one sensitive receiver and would be confirmed during detailed design)
  •   Notification letterbox drops to receivers in the area around the works locations, detailing work activities, time periods over which these would occur, impacts and mitigation measures
  •   Specific notifications provided to receivers where the ground-borne noise levels are predicted to exceed the night-time NML, providing additional information when relevant and more specific information than covered in general letterbox drops.At receivers predicted to exceed the night-time NMLs by more than 10 dBA, the following mitigation measures would be considered in addition to those outlined above:
  •   Individual briefings to inform the residents about the impacts of the works and mitigation measures that would be implemented. Where the resident cannot be met with individually then an alternative form of engagement would be used
  •   Respite periods may be offered to affected residents during works where noise levels are predicted to exceed the NML by 10 dBA or more
  •   Alternative accommodation options may be offered to affected residents for the periods where noise levels are predicted to exceed the NML by 10 dBA or more.

    Vibration

    No sensitive receivers are located within the minimum working distances for roadheaders during tunnelling works for the mainline tunnel alignment. As such, vibration impacts associated with tunnelling works are expected to be negligible.

    Sydney Water Pressure Tunnel

    The M4-M5 Link mainline tunnels are expected to pass with clearances of 12 metres and 11 metres from the Sydney Water Pressure Tunnel and the Sydney Water City Tunnel, respectively. The Pressure tunnel, completed in 1935, carries drinking water from Potts Hill Reservoir to Waterloo and is a historically critical link in the water supply of Sydney. The City Tunnel, completed in 1961 is largely a duplicate of the Pressure Tunnel and connects the same locations.

Based on available project information, assessment according to DIN 4150 and a safe vibration threshold for the tunnels of 25 millimetres per second, the safe working distance is less than the anticipated offsets. As such, adverse impact from the effects of direct vibration is deemed unlikely.

Royal Prince Alfred Hospital

The Royal Prince Alfred (RPA) Hospital is located either side of Missenden Road in Camperdown, in NCA43. The hospital houses a variety of equipment that may be sensitive to vibration from tunnelling activities. The nearest RPA building to the tunnel alignment is the Camperdown Child and Family Clinical Services building which is 450 metres to the east of the nearest point tunnelling works. The next closest building is 600 metres from the works.

The proposed mainline tunnel alignment passes to the west of RPA. The nearest RPA building to the tunnel alignment is the Camperdown Child and Family Clinical Services building. This is located approximately 450 metres to the east of the nearest point tunnelling works for the project. The next closest RPA buildings are approximately 600 metres to the east of the nearest point of tunnelling works.

It is anticipated that the hospital would be consulted during detail design to establish appropriate design vibration levels taking into account any sensitive equipment that may be located within the hospital.

Rock breaking and blasting

Blasting and rock-breaking may be used to excavate benches, cross passages and other voids within the tunnel sections of the project. There is potential for ground-borne noise and vibration impacts from these activities where receivers are situated above the tunnel.

The use of excavators with breakers within the tunnels has the potential to generate ground-borne noise at the surface. The potential for ground-borne noise due to rock-breaking within the tunnels increases with decreasing distance to the surface. Such excavation methods, however, may only be required at certain locations within the tunnels, limiting the locations that might be subject to associated ground-borne noise and the number of potentially affected receivers. Also, there is scope to schedule rock-breaking within the tunnels to avoid impacts in the more sensitive evening and night- time periods. The potential for impacts associated with rock-breaking within the tunnel would be considered further during the development of the detailed design and detailed construction methodologies. Appropriate measures to reduce the potential for ground-borne noise impacts due to rock-breaking within the tunnels would be included in the project CNVMP.

As any blasting required for the project would be conducted within the mainline tunnel, airborne noise and airblast overpressure impacts would be negligible at sensitive receivers in or near the project footprint.

While the proposed blasting may generate audible ground-borne noise at receivers above tunnelling works, assessment of impulsive blasting, typically conducted as a single event, against the ICNG LAeq(15minute) criteria is not appropriate.

At a location with a typical 30 metre depth of cover, the predicted level of vibration at the surface for a maximum instantaneous charge of 10 kilograms is 12 millimetres per second. This is below the transient vibration guide value for the prevention of cosmetic building damage of 26 millimetres per second. However, where the subject building is a heritage listed item, and is considered to be structurally unsound, a transient vibration guide value for the prevention of cosmetic building damage would be four millimetres per second.

The corresponding guide value for human comfort is a maximum of 10 millimetres per second. Compliance with a ground vibration level of 10 millimetres per second is predicted to be achieved by using a maximum instantaneous charge of approximately 7.0 kilograms.

Blasting recommendations

Blasting has the potential to significantly reduce noise and vibration impacts if managed appropriately by the contractor. Blasting is proposed as an excavation technique because the potential vibration and ground-borne noise impacts from blasting are of a much shorter duration for nearby sensitive receivers compared to the vibration impacts associated with mechanical excavation methods such as rock-breakers.

 

If blasting is proposed, noise and vibration impact predictions for blasting operations would be undertaken in the detailed design phase when more information is available on the blasting scope and methods. Blasting specific noise and vibration mitigation methods would be incorporated into the CNVMP where required.

Blasting would be restricted to standard daytime hours only (except where approved by the relevant authority). Site investigations would be conducted prior to production blasting to define suitable blast sizes to comply with project blasting noise and vibration criteria. Dilapidation studies of nearby receiver buildings may be required where potential for exceedances of the blasting criteria are identified.

10.3.8 Utility works

Construction works associated with utility relocation, diversions and connections would likely be required at most ancillary facility and construction sites. Utility works would also be required along various streets in the vicinity of construction sites and ancillary facility locations. Where the utilities are within the road reserve, the work may be required outside standard daytime construction hours.

The Utilities Management Strategy (refer to Appendix F) prepared for the project provides details about known utilities adjustments that would be required to facilitate the project. Other utility works would be identified during development of the detail design and construction methodology. The types of equipment required to carry out the utility works would likely include typical ground excavation items such as excavators, vacuum trucks, boring and directional drilling machines, concrete saws and rock-breakers.

An assessment of the potential noise levels from the likely plant items associated with utility works is provided in Table 10-61. Noise levels have been predicted at various offset distances to give an indication of the possible impacts with line of sight.

Table 10-61 Potential noise levels from utility works

Equipment

Predicted noise level at distance (LAeq(15-minute) dBA)

15 m

30 m

50 m

70 m

Vacuum truck

84

78

74

71

Directional drilling

76

70

66

63

Concrete saw1

85

79

75

72

Excavator

77

71

67

64

Excavator (breaker)1

86

80

76

73

Hand tools (unpowered)

62

56

52

49

Note 1: Assumed to be working for 7.5 minutes in worst case 15-minute period.

Table 10-61 shows that relatively high noise impacts are likely where noise intensive plant items are required near to adjacent receivers. On typical streets surrounding the construction sites, residential receivers are situated around 15 metres from the road. In this situation, noise levels as high as 86 dBA are possible when noise intensive plant items are in use.

Utilities are often within or immediately adjacent to trafficable parts of the road network. As such, lane occupancies are often required to facilitate utility works. To maintain the operational integrity of the surrounding road network, utility works in busy road corridors must often be carried out outside standard day time construction hours when traffic volumes are low. Night-time NMLs in the vicinity of most worksites are in the region of 40 to 50 dBA. As such, exceedances of greater than 30 dBA above NML are likely where noise intensive plant items are in use during the night-time.

Specific management measures for potential noise and vibration impacts due to utility works would be determined when further information regarding the extent and locations of the works is known. Potential noise impacts would be managed by adopting standard management measures which would be outlined in a CNVMP. The potential noise impacts associated with utility works would be identified when the extent and locations of the works have been confirmed. Appropriate mitigation measures would be selected from the CNVG and implemented.

10.4 Assessment of operational road traffic impacts

This assessment compares noise levels predicted due to the project in 2023 (modelled as the year ‘at opening’) and 2033 (modelled as 10 years after opening) with those predicted without the project. Impacts associated with the project only are accounted for by assessing the ‘Do Something’ traffic scenario. Cumulative impacts are accounted for by assessing an additional scenario (the ‘Do Something Plus’ traffic scenario) which uses road traffic inputs for the full WestConnex scheme in addition to key infrastructure/development proposals in the Greater Sydney area (including the proposed future Western Harbour Tunnel and Beaches Link, Sydney Gateway and F6 Extension projects).

Under the ‘Do Something’ scenario, even without additional noise mitigation (ie over and above road design and traffic management), the project is predicted to reduce the overall number of sensitive receivers with an exceedance of the relevant noise goals. This is mainly due to areas where the project reduces traffic, such as sections of Victoria Road in Rozelle, where surface traffic would be significantly reduced.

The change in road traffic noise exposure is generally anticipated to be less than 2 dBA in areas such as The Crescent and parts of Johnston Street where traffic volume is forecast to increase. This change in road traffic noise exposure is considered by the NSW EPA to be barely perceptible. In Iron Cove to the south of Victoria Road where substantial buildings would be removed to accommodate the proposed road widening, exposure to road traffic noise is anticipated to increase by over 5 dBA at the immediately adjacent receivers and would require consideration of mitigation measures to mitigate operational noise impact. If the Haberfield Option B construction sites are selected, consideration of additional noise mitigation at six residential receivers including multi-storey buildings would be required due to reduced screening benefit with the removal of intervening shielding.

Operational road traffic impacts have been predicted where surface works associated with the project are required. This corresponds to noise catchments NCA15 to NCA37. All floors of multi-storey receiver buildings are included in the assessment and evaluated against the applicable noise criteria. The assessment counts each floor in a multi-storey dwelling as a separate receiver; for example, a two-storey residential building would count as two receivers.

10.4.1 Operational noise predictions without mitigation

The approach taken in this assessment is to assess noise impacts from the project by considering the ‘Do Nothing’ scenario to represent the No Build (ie ‘without project’) impacts and the ‘Do Something’ scenario to represent the Build (ie ‘with project’) impacts.

Noise predictions throughout the study area indicate that receivers adjacent to the project footprint are subject to existing road traffic noise impacts and in many cases already exceed the NCG controlling criterion, as shown in the No Build scenarios in Table 10-62, which summarises the predicted change in noise levels (Build minus No Build) across the study area.

Table 10-62 Receivers exceeding the NCG controlling criteria without mitigation

NCA

Receiver type

Floor

2023 No build

2023 Build

2033 No build

2033 Build

Day

Night

Day

Night

Day

Night

Day

Night

NCA15

All

All

76

76

72

70

77

76

70

70

NCA16

All

All

149

134

133

118

152

138

137

124

NCA17

All

All

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

NCA18

All

All

2

2

0

0

2

2

0

0

NCA19

All

All

262

227

195

184

266

233

201

187

NCA20

All

All

28

23

15

7

28

28

15

10

NCA Receiver Floor type

2023 No build

2023 Build

2033 No build

2033 Build

Day

Night

Day

Night

Day

Night

Day

Night

NCA21 All All

270

222

242

208

333

246

250

226

NCA22 All All

130

129

130

130

130

130

130

130

NCA23 All All

133

125

145

134

140

131

153

149

NCA24 All All

487

453

472

440

492

467

479

447

NCA25 All All

286

268

293

281

290

274

293

290

NCA26 All All

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

NCA27 All All

32

45

71

200

41

85

71

222

NCA28 All All

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

NCA29 All All

224

220

211

207

228

222

211

209

NCA30 All All

190

180

169

159

195

180

170

160

NCA31 All All

201

173

200

172

201

173

201

172

NCA32 All All

92

72

89

70

92

73

89

72

NCA33 All All

54

45

61

52

56

52

63

57

NCA34 All All

106

103

95

90

108

104

96

92

NCA35 All All

317

301

316

298

319

304

316

301

NCA36 All All

54

52

40

39

54

54

39

39

NCA37 All All

66

0

66

0

69

0

65

0

NCA38 All All

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

NCA39 All All

41

40

41

41

41

41

41

41

NCA40 All All

63

53

64

54

63

54

64

55

All All All

3263

2943

3120

2954

3377

3067

3154

3053

Note:

Predicted noise levels at receivers which are above the NCG controlling criteria do not necessarily qualify for additional noise mitigation. As per the discussion in section 10.1.6, further criteria are used to determine which of those receivers are eligible for additional noise mitigation measures.

The information presented in Table 10-62 and Figure 10-22 indicates that:

  •   The project is predicted to result in an overall decrease in the number of receivers with an exceedance of the NCG criteria across the study area as a whole during both the daytime and night-time periods, in both 2023 and 2033. This is mainly due to forecast reductions in traffic volumes on some parts of the road network as a result of the project (ie moving vehicles from surface roads to the tunnels)
  •   The project is predicted to result in a reduction in noise levels for approximately 65 per cent of the receivers within the study area
  •   A minor (less than 2 dBA) increase in noise levels is predicted at just over 34 per cent of the receivers. This magnitude of noise increase is noted in the RNP as being unlikely to be perceptible by the average person
  •   Less than one per cent of the receivers are predicted to experience an increase of more than 2 dBA due to the project
  •   Marginal increases (1-2 dBA) are seen on The Crescent and parts of Johnston Street, and also on some of the adjacent roads, such as Gordon Street, associated with increased volume due to redistribution of traffic
  •   Of the total number of receivers over the daytime NCG criteria in the No Build (ie without the project), between five and seven per cent are predicted to experience a reduction to below the criteria with the project
  •   Significant reductions in noise (up to around -4 dBA) are identified along sections of Victoria Road in Rozelle, where the project is forecast to significantly reduce traffic numbers
  •   Large increases in noise (up to around +15 dBA) are identified in NCA33 and NCA36 (on Victoria Road near Iron Cove Bridge in the vicinity of the proposed tunnel portals) and NCA25 (near the new Victoria Road bridge), where the project results in traffic lanes being moved closer to receivers, in combination with removing existing screening due to property acquisitions. These predicted increases are generally limited to the receivers that would have partial or direct line of sight to Victoria Road once the acquired buildings are demolished. This location would be assessed further during development of the detailed design to identify appropriate noise mitigation measures to address these large predicted increases. The measures that would be considered would include low road noise pavement, noise barriers, at-property treatments and beneficial changes to the project design.The requirement for the project to provide additional noise mitigation is largely due to the existing high noise levels. That is, the project contributes only a relatively minor change in noise levels but when considered cumulatively the identified exceedances qualify receivers for additional noise mitigation.

10.4.2 Receivers considered for additional noise mitigation

A total of 431 receivers (200 individual buildings) are predicted to have exceedances of the operational road traffic noise criteria for the project and are therefore eligible for consideration of additional noise mitigation. The 431 exceedances fall into the following categories:

  •   The predicted Build noise level exceeds the NCG controlling criterion, and the noise level increase due to the project is greater than 2 dBA. A total of 29 receivers are triggered on this criterion alone
  •   The predicted Build noise level is 5 dBA or more above the criteria (exceeds the cumulative limit) and the receiver is significantly influenced by project road noise, regardless of the incremental impact of the project. A total of 155 receivers are triggered on this criterion alone
  •   Where the noise level contribution from the road project is acute (daytime LAeq(15hour) 65 dBA or higher, or night-time LAeq(9hour) 60 dBA or higher) then it qualifies for consideration of noise mitigation, even if noise levels are dominated by another road. While some receivers are predicted to experience noise levels above acute levels, no receivers are triggered on this criterion alone
  •   247 receivers are triggered due to a mix of the above criteria.
    The NCAs with the most triggered receivers are NCA25, NCA33, NCA35 and NCA36. Thesecatchments are at Iron Cove and adjacent to Victoria Road.Forty-eight other sensitive receivers (27 individual buildings) are predicted to have exceedances of the operational road traffic noise criteria for the project and are therefore eligible for consideration of additional noise mitigation. The other sensitive receivers that are eligible for consideration of additional mitigation are primarily located in NCA25, NCA27, NCA31 and NCA37.

    Sixty-four per cent of the identified receivers are on the first two floors, with 15 per cent of the triggers being on level three, nine per cent being on level four, four per cent on level five, and eight per cent for all floors including and above level six.

    Additional noise mitigation

    The operational assessment has identified the potential noise benefits associated with the use of low noise pavement, noise barrier and at-property treatment. However, due to engineering uncertainties as well as unresolved urban design challenges, a provisional noise mitigation option in the form of at- property treatment has been recommended. A preferred noise mitigation option (low noise pavement, noise barrier, architectural treatments, a combination or other) would be determined during detailed design taking into account whole-of-life engineering considerations and the overall social, economic and environmental effects. The preference would be given to selecting noise mitigation measures that reduce outdoor noise levels and the number of at-property treatment.

    In sensitive receiver locations where exceedances of the operational noise criteria are predicted, new or increased height noise barriers have been considered where four or more eligible properties are found to be closely spaced. Where the number of exceeding receivers is found to be three or less, the specification of noise barriers is not considered to be a reasonable or cost-effective approach and at- property treatments of these receivers should be considered by Roads and Maritime in conjunction with the construction contractor during the detailed design stage. This approach is consistent with the NMG. At present only one location (Iron Cove north) is recommended for an additional noise barrier.

    10.4.3 Maximum noise levels

    Indicative increases in maximum noise levels have been predicted in the noise model using a source height corresponding to the approximate height of a truck exhaust.

    The noise predictions indicate that maximum noise levels may increase at residential receivers in the following locations:

 NCA33 and NCA36 – receivers south of Victoria Road adjacent to the Iron Cove Link tunnel portals. In this location, demolition of acquired buildings results in residences having line of sight to the widened Victoria Road where they were previously screened by existing buildings.

 

Indicatively, typical increases of between 5 dBA and 10 dBA are predicted. Some receivers in this catchment would be eligible for consideration of at-property treatments as part of the project

 NCA24 – receivers west of Victoria Road at Rozelle. In this location, demolition of acquired buildings results in some residences having line of sight to Victoria Road where they were previously screened by existing buildings. Indicatively, typical increases of between 2 dBA and 10 dBA are predicted. A small number of receivers experience a higher increase due to the removal of adjacent buildings. Some receivers in this catchment would be eligible for consideration of at- property treatments as part of the project.

The change in maximum operational noise levels at receivers in other catchment areas is predicted to be negligible.

While it is noted that existing bus operations mean that the character of noise would not be expected to change, service frequency and final stop location may influence noise levels from bus operations and should be considered further during detailed design.

10.4.4 Operational assessment at Haberfield/Ashfield Option B

Property acquisitions of existing commercial buildings (for demolition) may be required at Haberfield if Option B is selected, since this option would result in residential receivers that were previously screened from Parramatta Road being subject to reduce screening benefit.

Receivers that have been identified as being eligible for consideration of additional noise mitigation are presented in Figure 10-23.

The removal of intervening shielding requires the consideration of additional noise mitigation at six residential receivers. The potential impacts should be further investigated during detailed design to confirm mitigation options should this option be selected.

10.4.5 Operational impacts at either end of the project footprint

While no major permanent road infrastructure is proposed at either ends of the project as part of the M4-M5 Link, the future (2033 Build) traffic volumes (including other major Sydney road projects) may influence noise levels at adjacent receivers in these areas. Both ends of the M4-M5 Link interface with other stages of WestConnex; the M4 East project at Haberfield and the New M5 project at St Peters, both of which will significantly alter the road design in the respective areas.

As part of the EIS reports prepared for both the M4 East and the New M5 projects, noise and vibration assessments were prepared to assess operational traffic noise on:

  •   The surface road network at Haberfield including Parramatta Road, Frederick Street/Wattle Street/Dobroyd Parade and Ramsay Street
  •   The surface road network at St Peters including Campbell Road, the Princes Highway, Euston Road.Both of these interfacing WestConnex projects (the M4 East and New M5 projects) are considered within the WestConnex program and as such considered a future forecast traffic scenario which included the M4-M5 Link (and other major Sydney road projects) as part of their EIS assessment of potential cumulative impacts. The cumulative scenario assessed for each of these interfacing project identified receivers which were subject to a perceptible increase in noise level of more than 2 dBA and exceeds noise criterion or where noise level remain 5 dBA above the noise criterion. Appropriate mitigation measures recommended to address these impacts can include the treatment of road surfaces, noise barriers and/or architectural treatments where feasible and reasonable.

    Conditions of Approval

    The conditions of approval for both of the interfacing WestConnex projects require the Proponent of each to undertake an Operational Noise and Vibration Review (ONVR) to confirm the operational noise predictions, impacts on receivers and the suitability of proposed mitigation measures. This review would be based on the final detailed design of each project and updated traffic modelling forecasts for the future traffic scenario as required by NSW EPA Road Noise Policy.

    Reference is made to the following Instrument of Approval for each project:

  •   M4 East: SSI 6307 dated 11 February 2016
  •   New M5: SSI 6788 dated 20 April 2016.

    Potential changes – M4-M5 Link

    For the M4-M5 Link, differences in the forecast traffic volumes on the surface road network at Haberfield and St Peters may occur as the result of a combination of factors including:

  •   Updated version of traffic model (WestConnex Road Traffic Model version 2.3)
  •   Updated land use, employment forecasts and future projects that form part of the cumulativeoperational scenario
  •   Changes in design of M4-M5 Link project.The changes in forecast traffic volumes between the interfacing WestConnex projects and the M4-M5 Link and in turn differences in the operational noise assessments would be captured in a progressive manner by:
  •   The ONVRs being undertaken as part of the conditions of approval for the M4 East project which is due to open in 2019 and the New M5 project which is due to open in 2020
  •   The ONVR that will be undertaken as part of the conditions of approval for the M4-M5 Link project (should that project be approved). The project is due to open in a staged manner in 2022 and 2023

Mitigation for cumulative impacts

Consistent with the requirements of the NMG, the future forecast traffic volumes are required to be considered in the assessment of the final design for each project and are therefore expected to be addressed in the respective ONVR for each interfacing project. This would be addressed through the following process:

  •   The Proponents of the M4 East and New M5 projects are required to review the suitability of the operational noise mitigation measures (refer to Condition E33 for the M4 East project and Condition E37 for the New M5 project)
  •   Under these conditions, the Proponent must implement the identified noise and vibration control measures of the final design and make the ONVR publicly available
  •   The Proponents for the M4 East and New M5 projects are also required to undertake operational noise and vibration monitoring to compare the actual noise and vibration performance of the State significant infrastructure against the noise performance predicted in the ONVR (refer to Condition E34 for the M4 East project and Condition E38 for the New M5 project)
  •   The Proponents for these projects must implement further feasible and reasonable mitigation measures (where required) as identified in the Operational Noise and Vibration Compliance Report in consultation with affected property owners (refer to Condition E35 for the M4 East project and Condition E39 for the New M5 project).The Operational Noise and Vibration Compliance Report for each project is expected to include assessment of the final design with calibration of the noise model taking into account considerations such as traffic numbers and land use change (if applicable). It is therefore anticipated that any changes in design as well as forecast traffic in the as-built noise model would be used to evaluate the adequacy of noise mitigation measures during preparation of the Operational Noise and Vibration Compliance Report for each project (M4 East and the New M5).

    10.4.6 Minor changes to project design

    As with any large infrastructure project, minor design refinements are investigated as the project progresses through the design stages. Minor design changes can include reconfiguration of lane markings, provision of additional turning lanes, and alteration and relocation of kerbs.

    The M4-M5 Link project is currently evaluating potential minor design changes in a number of locations:

  •   Wattle Street/Parramatta Road/Frederick Street turning lane configurations
  •   Additional right turn lane on The Crescent at the intersection with Johnston Street
  •   Minor lane configuration changes at the St Peters interchange ramps.As these design changes are not expected to change the volume of traffic and would be within the road reserve, the change to operational road traffic noise levels at adjacent receivers would be expected to be negligible.Notwithstanding, the potential impacts of all design refinements associated with the project would be evaluated during detailed design when operational noise mitigation is reviewed prior to the project being constructed.

    10.4.7 Fixed facilities operational noise impacts

    Noise assessment

    Noise impacts from the operation of the fixed facilities associated with the project have been predicted for the NCAs nearest to the facilities. These predicted noise levels are summarised in Table 10-63.

Table 10-63 Predicted noise levels – fixed facilities

The above results assume the presence of existing noise barriers in the Rozelle and Iron Cove areas, and the noise barriers that are being constructed in the Haberfield area as part of the M4 East project.

The results indicate that the assessed fixed facilities are predicted to comply with the relevant criteria during the more stringent night-time period in all NCAs in the Haberfield, Darley Road, Rozelle and St Peters areas.

The selected mechanical equipment for each facility, and in particular Iron Cove Link, would be reviewed and assessed against the relevant operational noise criteria at the detailed design stage of the project. Specific plant would be selected and designed to achieve compliance with the relevant criteria. The cumulative noise emissions from all fixed facility noise sources should be considered when determining the appropriate mitigation options.

Modifying factors

The indicative source levels have not been found to trigger the requirement to correct the predicted noise level due to low frequency or tonal components. Notwithstanding, tonal and/or low frequency noise is often observed from fans and the predictions would be revisited during detailed design based on the actual specifications of the final selection of equipment. Based on the assessment presented in this report, receivers in NCA09, NCA13, NCA34, NCA35 and NCA49 have been identified as most likely to exceed the criteria specified in Table 10-63 should application of a +5 dBA correction be triggered (see section 10.1.7).

Mitigation

The equipment and sound power levels modelled are indicative only and may be subject to change during the detailed design phase of the project. It is envisaged that the mechanical plant noise sources associated with the fixed facilities would be controllable by common engineering methods that may consist of:

  •   Judicious location selection
  •   Noise barriers
  •   Silencers
  •   Acoustically lined ductwork
  •   Acoustic louvres.The selected mechanical equipment for each facility, and in particular at Iron Cove, would be reviewed and assessed against the relevant operational noise criteria at the detailed design stage of the project. Specific plant would be selected and designed to achieve compliance with the relevant criteria. The cumulative noise emissions from all fixed facility noise sources would be considered when determining the appropriate mitigation options.

10.5 Environmental management measures

Mitigation and management measures for potential ambient noise and vibration impacts during construction and operation are shown in Table 10-64. Most of these measures are routinely employed as ‘standard practice’ on projects of this scale.

Table 10-64 Noise and vibration management measures to be implemented during construction and operation

Impact

No.

Environmental management measure

Timing

Construction

Construction noise and vibration impacts

NV1

A suitably qualified and experienced acoustics advisor, who is independent of the design and construction personnel, will be engaged for the duration of construction of the project. The acoustics advisor will be responsible for:

  •   Reviewing management plans related to noise and vibration and endorsing that they address all relevant conditions of approval and requirements of all applicable guidelines
  •   Providing advice to the Proponent, the construction contractor(s) and the Secretary regarding the management of potential noise and vibration impacts associated with the project and compliance with relevant conditions of approval.

Construction

 

Impact

No.

Environmental management measure

Timing

NV2

A Construction Noise and Vibration Management Plan will be prepared for the project. The plan will:

  •   Identify relevant performance criteria in relation to noise and vibration
  •   Identify noise and vibration sensitive receivers and features in the vicinity of the project
  •   Include standard and additional mitigation measures from CNVG and details about when each will be applied
  •   Describe the process(es) that will be adopted for carrying out location and activity specific noise and vibration impact assessments to assist with the selection of appropriate mitigation measures
  •   Include protocols that will be adopted to manage works required outside standard construction hours in accordance with relevant guidelines
  •   Detail monitoring that will be carried out to confirm project performance in relation to noise and vibration performance criteria.The CNVMP will be implemented for the duration of construction of the project.

Construction

NV3

Detailed noise assessments will be carried out for all ancillary facilities required for construction of the project. The assessment will consider the proposed site layouts and noise generating activities that will occur at the facilities and assess predicted noise levels against the relevant noise management levels determined in accordance with the requirements of the ICNG. The assessments will be used to determine the appropriate heights and configurations of noise barriers, and other appropriate noise management measures, consistent with the requirements of the ICNG and the CNVG. Noise barriers, as confirmed through the noise assessments, will be installed as early as possible during site establishment and as a minimum prior to the commencement of excavation associated with tunnel access.

Construction

NV4

Location and activity specific noise and vibration impact assessments will be carried out prior to (as a minimum) activities:

  •   With the potential to result in noise levels above 75 dBA at any receiver
  •   Required outside standard construction hours likely to result in noise levels in greater than the relevant noise management levels
  •   With the potential to exceed relevant performance criteria for vibration.The assessments will clarify predicted impacts at relevant receivers in the vicinity of the activities to assist with the selection of appropriate management measures, consistent with the requirements of ICNG and CNVG, that will be implemented during the works.

Construction

Impact

No.

Environmental management measure

Timing

Out-of-hours noise impacts

NV5

An out-of-hours works protocol will be developed for the construction of the project. The protocol will include:

  •   Details of works required outside standard construction hours, including justification of why the activities are required outside standard construction hours
  •   Measures that will be implemented to manage potential impacts associated with works outside standard construction hours
  •   Location and activity specific noise and vibration impact assessment process(es) that will be followed to identify potentially affected receivers, clarify potential impacts and select appropriate management measures
  •   Details of the approval process (internal and external) for works proposed outside standard construction hours.The protocol will be prepared in consultation with DP&E and the NSW EPA, endorsed by the acoustic advisor for the project and implemented during construction of the project.

Construction

Additional noise and vibration activity impacts

NV6

Monitoring will be carried out at the commencement of new noise and vibration intensive activities and works in new locations to confirm that actual noise and vibration levels are consistent with noise and vibration impact predictions and that the management measures that have been implemented are appropriate.

Construction

Acoustic sheds

NV7

Acoustic sheds will be designed within consideration of the activities that will occur within them and the relevant noise management levels in adjacent areas. Monitoring will be carried out to confirm that the actual acoustic performance of the sheds is consistent with predicted acoustic performance.

Construction

Vibration impacts

NV8

A Blast Management Strategy will be prepared and implemented for the project if blasting is proposed. The strategy will:

  •   Identify relevant performance criteria in relation to potential noise and vibration impacts due to blasting with reference to (as a minimum) Technical Basis for Guidelines to Minimise Annoyance Due to Blasting Overpressure and Ground Vibration (ANZEC, 1990) and Australian Standard AS 2187.2-2006 Explosives – Storage, transport and use, Part 2: Use of explosives
  •   Describe trials that will be carried out to confirm vibration levels from blasting and facilitate development of predictive tools to allow potential noise and vibration impacts to be identified
  •   Include details of management measures that will be implemented to ensure compliance with relevant performance criteria.The Blast Management Strategy will be implemented for all blasting carried out as part of the project.

Construction

Impact

No.

Environmental management measure

Timing

Operational noise impacts

NV9

Receivers that qualify for assessment for at receiver treatment in relation to operational noise that are also predicted to experience significant exceedances of noise management levels due to construction will be given priority preference for assessment. When at receiver treatments are found to be appropriate, the application of the treatment will be expedited.

Construction

NV10

Where reasonable and feasible, operational noise mitigation such as noise barriers, berms and at-property treatments identified during detailed design should be installed early in the project so as to provide a benefit to receivers during the construction phase of the project.

Construction

Road traffic noise

NV11

The use of low noise pavement to further reduce road traffic noise at the source will be investigated during detailed design taking into account whole-life engineering considerations and the overall social, economic and environmental effects. If low noise pavement is found to be appropriate, it would be considered as a management measure when assessing operation noise impacts based on the detailed design.

Construction

NV12

The area in the vicinity of the western portal of the Iron Cove Link, Rozelle, will be assessed further during development of the detailed design to identify appropriate noise mitigation measures to address predicted increases in road traffic noise to the project. The measures that will be considered will include low road noise pavement, noise barriers, at-property treatments and the project design.

Construction

Operation

Operational noise performance

ON13

Potential operational noise performance of the project based on the detailed design will be assessed and appropriate management measures will be confirmed and implemented.

Construction

ONV14

Within 12 months of the commencement of the operation of the project, actual operational noise performance will be compared to predicted operational noise performance. The need for any additional management measures to address any identified operational performance issues and meet relevant operational noise criteria will be assessed and implemented where reasonable and feasible.

Operation

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